Road crashes are the third-leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24 in Canada. Parachute’s National Teen Driver Safety Week (NTDSW) is an annual campaign to build awareness of teen driver safety issues and to encourage community and youth involvement as part of the solution. 

In fatal crashes, drivers aged 20 to 25 were more likely to be distracted than all other age groups, followed by drivers aged 16 to 19. Parachute NTDSW wants to help put a stop to these preventable deaths by bringing awareness to the serious issue of distracted driving among teens and young adults. 

Join the conversation on social media using the hashtags #DrivingTakes100 and #NTDSW2022.

Who should use this guide 

This guide is for all community leaders and partners who use social media tools, or online communication media in a professional capacity; including, but not limited to the following: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TikTok or blogs.

Follow our lead 

Throughout the month of October, including NTDSW Oct. 16 to 22, Parachute will be active on all our social media platforms promoting NTDSW messaging. Follow us and feel free to comment, share, like, re-post and re-tweet our content. We’ll make sure to do the same with as many of our partners as possible.

Twitter: www.twitter.com/parachutecanada  

Facebook: www.facebook.com/parachutecanada

Instagram: www.instagram.com/parachutecanada

Use hashtags 

Hashtags are the best way to track the activity across social media platforms. We encourage the use of the following hashtags in all social media channels to help us gain momentum, as we build a community of support.

Primary hashtag: #DrivingTakes100            

Additional hashtag: #NTDSW2022            

When you should start posting

Feel free to start as soon as possible. Tweeting and posting about NTDSW helps us boost the number of people we reach, raising awareness about the campaign ahead of October 16. 

What you should share

Our NTDSW resources website will have plenty of information about our campaign, and it’s a great link to share on social media. Here’s the direct link to our 2022 resources: parachute.ca/ntdsw. The page contains free downloadable images developed for social media that you can share freely on your social media channels.

Quick, relevant facts you can use to start conversations on your social media platforms: 

  • Drivers who text while driving are up to six times more likely to be involved in a crash. 
  • The risk of a crash increases when you take your eyes and attention off the road, even just for a second. Remove the temptation by keeping your phone out of reach while driving
  • In fatal crashes, drivers aged 20 to 25 were more likely to be distracted than all other age groups, followed by drivers aged 16 to 19.
  • Road crashes are the third-leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24 in Canada.
  • Young people are killed in crashes at a higher rate than any other age group under 75 years old. 
  • Transport injuries for youth and young adults cost the Canadian economy $990 million in a single year.
  • Teen drivers killed in a crash are more likely than any other age group to test positive for cannabis.
  • Alcohol is a factor in almost half of fatal crashes among 16- to 25-year-olds
  • Drivers under 25 are more likely than any other age group to use a device while driving, increasing the risk of a collision.
  • The average train needs at least 2 km to stop. Trains can stop, but they can’t stop quickly!
  • Trespassing on a railway is illegal and is a leading factor in railway-related deaths and injuries. In 2020, 67% of all rail incidents involving trespassers were fatal and 33% resulted in serious injury.
  • An average freight train weighs over 5,500 tonnes. Compare that to a car, which weighs about 1.5 tonnes. A train hitting a car is like a car hitting a pop can.

Samples tweets/social media posts

Below are sample posts you can use as tweets on Twitter or as posts on other social media channels. You’re also welcome and encouraged to come up with your own tweets and messages that make sense for your organization and your community! Please note that tweets can only be 280 characters in length (including links). We have images we encourage you to use, which can be downloaded as a folder from parachute.ca/ntdsw-images.

Starting now

  • October 16 to 22 is National Teen Driver Safety Week! Join the conversation on social media, using the hashtags #DrivingTakes100 #NTDSW2022 parachute.ca/ntdsw  
  • Oct. 16 to 22 & learn more here at parachute.ca/ntdsw  
  • Oct. 16 to 22. Remind teens that #DrivingTakes100 parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022
  • Oct. 16 to 22! #DrivingTakes100 resources are available for communities & schools at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022

Starting Oct. 16 (First Day of National Teen Driver Safety Week)

  • DYK? Distraction can be defined as anything that takes a driver’s attention away from the task at hand and can be classified into three categories: visual, manual and cognitive. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Some examples of driver distraction include daydreaming, using your phone to talk, text/read, talking to friends in the car, switching songs, changing the temperature, eating, smoking and even putting on make-up. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • The legal definitionof distracted driving varies by province and territory, as do the penalties for this offence. Make sure you’re familiar with the distracted driving laws in your area. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Young drivers may drive distracted for different reasons: fear of missing out (FOMO), texting while driving to stay connected to their friends. Learn why distracted driving is a bad idea at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Drivers who text while driving are up to six times more likely to be involved in a crash. Eyes on the road. That message can wait. Don’t drive distracted. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • When you use your cell phone, your eyes aren’t on the road, and you miss seeing information you need to drive safely. Don’t put yourself or others at risk; keep your focus on the road. More at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • The risk of a crash increases when you take your eyes and attention off the road, even just for a second. Remove the temptation by keeping your phone out of reach while driving. More at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Your phone can do a lot of things, but it can’t drive a car. Turn your phone off while you’re driving. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Don’t drive distracted: Text your friends before you leave, wait to post your new video when you get home, and leave your phone in the back seat. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Texting your friend “be there in 5 min” might seem harmless and helpful but it’s not worth getting into a crash or getting injured. Check your ETA before you leave and text your friend before you start driving. parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • When you’re driving is not the time to like your friend’s post. Your friends want you to wait and like their posts when it is safe. More at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100.       
  • Are you a parent of a teen and do you use your phone when you drive? Your kid is more likely to do what you do, and risk injury or even death. Set the right example and put down your phone. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100
  • Phones aren’t the only thing that can distract you when you’re driving. Other distractions include in-car touchscreens, eating, passengers, and pets. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100

Posts about rail safety and distracted driving 

  • Saw the text, but did you see the train? Don’t put yourself or others at risk; keep your focus on the train track. Stay safe and learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • Trains are always much closer than they appear. Look, listen and be ready to stop. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • While waiting for trains to pass, be alert and don’t be distracted. A train can’t avoid you, but you can avoid a train. parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • A moving train may be going faster than it seems. Trains can take up to 2 km to come to a complete stop and, unlike cars, can’t swerve to avoid a collision. A train can’t avoid you, but you can avoid a train. parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • Only cross railway tracks at designated crossings. Taking shortcuts and crossing anywhere else could be deadly. Learn more at parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • Never try to drive or walk under, around, or over lowered or closing gates. At railway crossings, gates start closing almost immediately before the train reaches the crossing. Obey the signals, stay back and wait. parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway
  • An average freight train weighs more than 5,500 tonnes. Compare that to a car, which weighs about 1.5 tonnes. A train hitting a car is like a car hitting a pop can. parachute.ca/ntdsw #NTDSW2022 #DrivingTakes100 @CNRailway

Questions? 

Please contact Parachute’s social media team by e-mailing Margarita at socialmedia@parachute.ca.

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